The following is the first few sections of a chapter from The Busy Coder's Guide to Android Development, plus headings for the remaining major sections, to give you an idea about the content of the chapter.


Keyboard and Mouse Input

More and more Android users are starting to use external keyboards and mice with their devices. Sometimes, the device is designed for such use, such as the Jide Remix Mini or all-on-one units like the HP Slate 21. Some people use Android devices designed for use with a TV as quasi-desktops. And, starting in 2016, we have Android available on some Chrome OS devices, most of which rely on keyboard and mouse/trackpad input.

Over time, more and more Android users are going to be expecting Android apps to behave like desktop apps with respect to keyboards and mice. Some of this capability will be built into Android. Some of this capability will need to be handled by apps or libraries.

In this chapter, we will explore various techniques for making your Android app more friendly to keyboards and mice.

Prerequisites

Understanding this chapter requires that you have read the core chapters. Many of the examples use RecyclerView, so you may wish to review that chapter if you have not used RecyclerView very much. Also, some of the examples are based on drag-and-drop samples covered elsewhere in the book.

Offering Keyboard Shortcuts

The preview of this section was the victim of a MITM ('Martian in the middle') attack.

Custom Copy-and-Paste

The preview of this section did not survive Thanos's finger snap.

Physical Keyboards and Focusing

The preview of this section is being chased by zombies.

Offering Mouse Context Menus

The preview of this section apparently resembled a Pokémon.

Offering Tooltips

The preview of this section was accidentally identified as an Android 'tasty treat' by the Cookie Monster.

Pointer Capture

The preview of this section was eaten by a grue.